JGAURORA 3d Printer A5 Full Metal Frame Large Print Volume 305X305X320mm Color Touch Screen Resume Print Filament Runs Out Detection 3d Printing Machine Home School Industry Use

Characteristics :
●JGAURORA 3D printer A5 has light industry main body design, terseness and not lack of novelty.
● Large build size: 305*305*320mm (12*12*12.6in)
● BDG Heated Platform: Allows easy removable of printed model and save masking tape.
● Unique gapless feeding system, load filament smoothly, print excellent models.
● Intellective large touch screen control: Provides better 3D printing user experience. Semiautomatic leveling control.
● Power Failure Protection: Resume print from where the last print is stopped due to power failure.
● The Automatic Material Recognition system saves time and effort with material information and print profiles preloaded on each reel to let you start printing straight away.
● Better customer experience, high print accuracy and high speed with quiet working, suit for school and home.

Specs:
Layer thickness : 0.1-0.3mm
Filament Diameter:1.75mm
Build volume:305*305*320mm
Accuracy:0.1mm
Print speed:10-150mm/s
Nozzle diameter:0.4mm
Nozzle temp.:180~240’C
Hotbed temp.:room temp.~110’C
Machine size:536(L)*480(W)*543(H)mm (21*18.9*21.3 in)
Machine weight:13.8KG (30.4Lbs)
Packing size: 635*590*235mm(25*23.2*9.3in)
Packing weight:17kg (37.5Lbs)
Power:300W

Leveling: Semi-Auto
Operate:2.8in color touch screen
Screen language:English/Chinese
Filament:PLA/ABS/WOOD ect.
Support Format:STL,OBJ,G-Code
Platform: BDG platform
USB stick: Yes
Pause printing: Yes
Resume print due to power failure: Yes
Filament runs out detection: Yes
Slice software:Cura/Simplify3D/Slic3r/JGcreat

Product Features

  • JGAURORA 3d printer A5 has large build size: 305*305*320mm (12*12*12.6in)
  • Light industry main body design, terseness and not lack of novelty.
  • BDG Heated Platform: Allows easy removable of printed model and save masking tape.
  • Power Failure Protection: Resume print from where the last print was stopped due to power failure. Filament RUN-OUT detection : The machine beeps when filament runs out to remind you to change new filament quickly
  • Better customer experience, high print accuracy and high speed with quiet working, suit for school and home.And most importantly ,we offer 12 months warranty and maintenance from the date of your purchase

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ALUNAR 3D Printer Prusa I3 Kit Self Assembly Mini DIY Desktop FDM 3D Learning for Industry School Kids Education Similar to Anet A8

ALUNAR 3D printer is a DIY 3D printer I3 kit that comes with all the 3D printer spare parts needed.
This printer is widely used in education, industrial design, school research, home use and much more.
Not only you can learn and know how the 3D printer works
and also you can make some really neat objects by this ALUNAR I3 3D printer.

However, we must tell you:
1.This 3D printer is in need of great passion,

patience and operational ability since it is a DIY kit, comes with all 3D printer spare parts.
2. This 3D printer is perfect for PLA 3D printing, without heated bed.
3.This 3D printer is a user-certified printer kit, it is fully normally functional,
if any problems during the assembly and use, please contact us immediately to resolve.

Brand: ALUNAR
3D Printer Parameters:
Frame: Acrylic
Color: Black
Machine Size: 395*395*415mm
Packing Size: 500*460*150mm
Machine Weight:5.8 Kg
Gross Weight:8.0 kg
Power Adapter:
Input:AC110V/220V 50/60Hz
Output:DC12V 5A

Technical Specification:
Printing Technology: FDM
Heated Bed: NO
Print Size: 150*150*150mm
3D Filament: PLA/PETG/HIPS/WOOD/TPU
Filament Diameter: 1.75mm
Number of Extruder:1
Nozzle Diameter:0.4mm(default)
Printing Precision: 0.1-0.3mm
Printing Speed: 40-120mm/s
X Y Axis Speed: 500mm/s (MAX)
Z Axis Speed:5mm/s (MAX)
Nozzle Temperature:260℃(MAX)
Working condition:10-40℃
Humidity:20-50%
Operating System: Windows, Mac,Linux
Control Software: Repetier-Host,Cura
File format:STL,OBJ,G-code
Display LCD: MINI 12864
Interface:USB /TF card(support offline print)
Language:English

Package Included:
1* Black ALUNAR DIY 3D Printer Kit
1*3D Filament Spool Holder
1*3D Filament
1*USB Cable
1*TF Card
1*Tool Kit
and other spare parts

Product Features

  • First DIY 3D Printer Kit and Best Gift: classical black and unique blue versions for options.
  • Optimized and upgraded extruder for easy and safe filament loading and high precision printing.
  • Upgraded and certificated power adapter with power on and off switch make sure it’s so easy and safe to use the 3D printer.
  • Over Heat and Over Time Protection:If the preheat time over the origin, the printer will alarm and stop working to remind you.It is much safer.
  • Better modularization DIY parts and colorful sockets on main board for easier wiring and faster installation,so we can have fun and enjoy the assembly and get great learning experience.

Click Here If You Need More Detailed Info…

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In summer STEM program, high school students design 3-D printed hands for kids in need

A new summer STEM program is giving high school students from across Western New York the opportunity to help kids in need through 3-D printing and design.

On Thursday, the lunchroom at Health Sciences Charter School in Buffalo bustled with the sounds of 45 excited high school students. They’d all been brought together for a new summer program focused on STEM education.

As the morning began, three young children took seats amongst the students, and teachers began to interview them.

“What do you like to do?” asked technology education teacher Ed Hawkins.

“I like to play,” replied an initially shy Katelyn McCarthy from Derby.

Like the other two children interviewed, Katelyn was born with one partial forearm and no hand. Her mother, Amy, described the nine year old as outgoing once she opens up, and said the things Katelyn has been able to do with one hand have not been “challenges,” just thing that take a little longer to learn.

“It’s definitely made her more determined,” said Amy. “It makes her try a whole lot harder at things. She doesn’t give up. She tries and tries and tries until she gets it. She recently learned how to tie her shoes, ride her bike – just things that took a little longer, but she learned how to do it.”

Katelyn has had prosthetics since she was an infant – some of which have been heavy or difficult to use. But come August, she’ll get a new light-weight prosthetic limb – 3-D printed, and designed by the students of the Hand in Hand program.

“In this program, kids are going to learn anatomy. They’re going to learn about an achievable biomedical career. They’re going to learn about opportunities that are right here in Western New York and they’re going to create something that’s going to help somebody, and somebody right in their neighborhood,” explained Cherie Messore, Executive Director of Western New York STEM.

WNY STEM is Hand in Hand’s leading organizer. Collaborating with AT&T, the University at Buffalo, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and local schools, they put the call out for teachers and students interested in taking part in the program.

Ed Hawkins was one of them, and he ended up taking the lead educator role in Hand in Hand. Hawkins has a strong background in 3-D printing, having done it for years with his own students at Sweet Home Senior High School. And while he doesn’t have training in occupational therapy or medicine, Hawkins said getting to know the workings of the body so that he can teach students about it is all in looking at it from a technical perspective.

“It’s a biological system, but it’s really down to mechanics,” said Hawkins. “There’s hinges and tendons that work like cables. For myself, I try to break it down into a mechanical system.”

Hawkins also isn’t the only one teaching. Before they met Katelyn and the other recipients, the students met two occupational therapists who explained the realities of life with one hand. One of them even shared his personal experience as an amputee. From that training, students like future 11th grader Felice Masumbuko learned what’s important.

“You need to know math and science, like the geometry. You have to know the biometrics of your hands, eyes, all of that. Biometrics is examples like iris scans, retina scans, how the vessels are formed in your hand. You need to know all of that because even a slight mistake can mess up the whole product,” said Masumbuko.

After measurements of Katelyn and the other recipients’ limbs are taken, it’s time for the students to focus on the first steps in planning. While that happens, the children get a chance to visit a room down the hall filled with computers and 3-D printers – one of them cooling from a recent project, while another hums, slowly and carefully printing keepsake nametags for the students.

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The hands can be designed with various colors and customization like superhero and princess designs. Katelyn can’t be certain yet what color will be available, but she’s got something in mind.

“I really want it to be blue and pink,” she said.

Amy expects the new hand will help expand her daughter’s capability, and she appreciates what the Hand in Hand program offers both Katelyn and the students.

“She’s helping them see what they are creating and that it’s going to help her,” said Amy. “And I like that she’s going to be able to see how it’s done and how it’s created and how they’ve done it for her.”

The next step in the project is what Messore described as a “full court press” to design the hands, print prototypes, and get final products to a fabricator in East Aurora – all within the next week. Three hands will be created for the local children, and one for a child in India found through a community of 3D printers called e-NABLE – who coordinate projects like these around the world. And though it’s a short-term project, the impact of doing social good is already showing in students like soon-to-be 9th grader Cameren Hunley, who has begun to consider his own life.

“I look back when I see these children, I look back at my life and see all the things I did with these two hands,” said Hunley. “And then they have one, and it’s like, ‘What is it like to have one hand and not struggle to do things – things that other people do?’”

Cameren’s not the only one. Being a parent, as well as an educator, Ed Hawkins has quickly built an emotional connection to “Hand in Hand” and the children it will help.

“It’s cool to see these kids who have a significant deficit…they’re just like regular kids,” said a misty-eyed Hawkins. “We’re just trying to make it a little bit better.”

This story was produced with help from WBFO’s Dominic LoVallo.

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Students at Loveland Colorado's Lucile Erwin Middle School Creating Functional 3D Printed …

lems-logoIf you’re interested in 3D printing, Loveland, Colorado might just be the place for you. This city, just north of Denver, is after all, home to Aleph Objects, Inc. and the famed line of Lulzbot Printers, and one school is definitely benefiting from this.

In a recent case study, the LulzBot team gave us a glimpse into how Lucile Erwin Middle School is introducing their students to 3D printing—and how these young designers are quickly learning to design products that are fully functional and useful. As 3D printing technology has continued to become more accessible and affordable, schools are benefiting worldwide, and this is a topic we touch on often as the importance for graduates to have the 3D skillset grows, and jobs continue to remain open waiting for those with the knowledge. Today, we see 3D education beginning at all ages, with even the youngest generally enjoying the intuitive aspects of the software and hardware—as well as becoming very excited at the prospects of what can be designed and made.

At Lucile Erwin, the focus is on using 3D printing to teach students how to better solve problems.

“Our school is an International Baccalaureate school that focuses a lot on design thinking, and to have the software and the hardware that allows and fosters that design thinking, that creativity, that entrepreneurship piece is 21st century,” Jacob Marshall, a TED instructor at Lucile Erwin Middle School, said. “We are meeting the needs of the students and hopefully the demands in the future.”

And as most would agree, these students are very lucky to have access to the LulzBot Mini 3D printer. So far, under Marshall’s instruction, they have created things like ear-bud holders, prototypes for carrying grocery bags—and in another more advanced class, they have even 3D printed truck parts, originating from a Thingiverse design, which resulted in a remote control vehicle. Make sure to check out the video below, as it’s quite amazing!

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“LulzBot 3D printers are so user friendly I don’t have to maintain them or monitor them…and the kids can be super rough with them and they’re durable,” Marshall said. “What I also like about them is that their parts that make up the LulzBot 3D printers are 3D printed, so…if something goes down, we have all those files…that we can just print out.”

That’s certainly not something you can say about most machines—or even other 3D printers, and it adds a whole new level of education for the students in terms of maintenance, and ultimately, how a 3D printer is built. They also have access to Cura LulzBot Edition, making the process that much more user-friendly and fun with hundreds of built-in profiles for more than 30 materials, easy scaling of the 3D objects they are creating, options for support structures, and more.

lulzbot-mini-1Marshall’s class is very popular with the students as they become aware of what the others are learning.

“You get the overwhelming support for the class and the fight for the class to get in,” Marshall said. “You have a lot of kids who really want to be in here because they know they’ll have access to that type of technology.”

Some of the students already say they think they might like to pursue a career in engineering after becoming involved in this important aspect of STEM education.

“If you have an environment where you’re going to implement any type of design thinking, any type of prototyping product-driven type class, you’ve got to get a LulzBot 3D printer,” Marshall said. “It’s too easy for you as a teacher, it’s too easy for the kids and once they get the training, they just fly with it.”

You can find out more about the amazing students at Lucile Erwin Middle School here, and if you are interested in finding out about the educational programs available with Lulzbot printers, see here.

[Source: LulzBot / Photos licensed CC BY-SA 4.0 International © Lucile Erwin Middle School. Video licensed CC BY © Lucile Erwin Middle School.]

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