Sciaky Announces Record December Sales of EBAM Metal 3D Printing Systems

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Leading metal 3D printing solutions provider Sciaky, Inc., a subsidiary of global manufacturing and services holding company Phillips Service Industries, Inc. (PSI), launched its line of Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing (EBAM) machines nearly a decade ago, with an expanded line of EBAM 3D printing systems introduced in 2015. The exclusive technology uses an electron beam to liquefy a metal wire feed, and 3D prints dense, durable parts in an extremely hot vacuum environment, offering major opportunity for self-sustainability in metal component 3D printing.

Sciaky’s EBAM systems, which can deposit 7 to 20 lbs of material every hour, boast the industry’s most widely scalable metal 3D printing solution, and offer the fastest, most cost-effective deposition process for large-scale parts in the metal AM market. The company’s EBAM 3D printers can produce parts that range in length from 8 inches to 19 feet, and the technology has been used in many high-performance applications, like a titanium propulsion tank for Lockheed Martin, large titanium airplane parts for Airbus, and submarine fuel tanks.

Scott Phillips, President & CEO of Sciaky, Inc., said, “Sciaky is proud to deliver more best-in-class EBAM metal 3D printing systems to the marketplace, which will be leveraged in a wide range of land, sea, air and space applications. Now, more than ever, manufacturers are looking for ways to reduce time and cost associated with producing large, high-value parts, and Sciaky EBAM systems have a proven track record of helping manufacturers achieve these business-critical goals.”

Sciaky’s EBAM 150 Metal 3D Printing System.

Sciaky has worked extensively on projects in the aerospace, defense, and other manufacturing industries, and several of its EBAM systems were recently sold for use in similar applications. The company announced some great news today – Sciaky posted record sales of its breakthrough EBAM machines in December, as it sold a total of four systems in the last month of 2017.

Sciaky’s EBAM systems combine control and quality with its Interlayer Real-time Imaging and Sensing System (IRISS), the metal 3D printing market’s only real-time monitoring and control system that’s able to sense, and digitally self-adjust, the metal deposition with repeatability and precision. The closed-loop control that IRISS uses is the main reason why the EBAM process can offer consistency in part geometry, microstructure, metal chemistry, and mechanical properties.

Consistency will definitely be necessary, as the four EBAM systems sold last month will be used to 3D print large parts for warships and ground-based military vehicles, along with titanium structures for the aerospace industry.

A Sciaky EBAM 110 System.

Three of the four machines sold in December are the company’s popular EBAM 110 model, which has a work envelope of 70″ x 47″ x 63″ and a power level up to 42 kW. Sciaky also sold one of its EBAM 150 models, which will allow the customer to 3D print the largest metal parts in the industry on-site, thanks to its nominal part envelope of 146″ x 62″ x 62″.

“January is shaping up to be another great month for EBAM machine sales, and there will be more exciting industry news coming from Sciaky in the near future,” said Bob Phillips, Sciaky’s Vice President of Marketing.

All four of the EBAM metal 3D printing systems are scheduled to be delivered in mid-2018.

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[Source: PR Newswire]

3D printed graphene aerogel awarded Guiness World Record

Guiness World Records has named a 3D printed graphene aerogel as “the least dense 3D printed structure”. The 3D printed graphene aerogel, developed by a Kansas State University, University at Buffalo and Lanzhou University (China) team, weighs 0.5 milligrams per cubic centimeter. This achievement will be featured in the GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS 2018 Edition.

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The way the researchers print the three-dimensional graphene is also regarded as revolutionary. The researchers use a modified inkjet printer that uses two nozzles. They 3D print droplets of a graphene oxide and water mixture in a freezer on a cold plate that is minus 20 degrees Celsius. This method creates a 3D ice structure of graphene and frozen water, which helps the graphene to maintain its shape.

When printing is complete, the researchers place the 3D material in a freeze dryer, which removes the ice by providing high vacuum and low temperature. What’s left is a three-dimensional graphene aerogel that maintains its shape at room temperature.

This new printing method is seen as an improvement over existing ones because it uses fewer ingredients and only requires graphene oxide and frozen water. Additionally, the two nozzles on the modified printer enable the researchers to create complex shapes with less material, which makes it the lightest material in the world. “With this 3-D printing method, we can control the shape of the graphene aerogel and ideally, we can control the electric and mechanical properties for the aerogels, too,” the team said.

1000 MPH Record Attempting Bloodhound Car to Feature 3D Printed Titanium Steering Wheel

Speed, some people have an addiction to it, while others like British driver Andy Green are infatuated with it. So much so that he currently holds the all time land speed record for driving a vehicle. How fast you may ask? Only a measley 763 miles per hour. Andy originally broke the record almost 17 years ago in 1997. Since then he has broken his own record again, just a month later in October of 1997.

Andy Green

Andy Green

Andy still isn’t satisfied. He has set out on a course to try and achieve a new world record of 1000 miles per hour, traveled in a vehicle on land. Andy will be setting out on this record attempt in 2015 and 2016 in the South African Desert, thanks to a project known as Bloodhound. The mission statement for the Bloodhound project reads as follows:

“Create a unique, high-technology project, focused around a 1000 mph World Land Speed Record attempt. Share this Engineering Adventure with a global audience and inspire the next generation by bringing science, technology, engineering and mathematics to life in the most exciting way possible.”

The 3D Printed Titanium Steering Wheel

The 3D Printed Titanium Steering Wheel

The vehicle is expected to be able to accelerate from 0 to 1,000 mph within just 55 seconds, a speed which will exceed that of a speeding bullet fired from a Magnum 357. It will weigh approximately 17,165 pounds, and is 44 feet in length.

In order to drive at such incredible and dangerous speeds, where one small issue with the vehicle’s design could mean the difference between life and death for the driver, Andy and his team at Bloodhound are working with some of the most sophisticated manufacturing technologies on the market today. The Cockpit of the Bloodhound is tailored specificially towards driver Andy Green.

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The steering wheel has been 3D printed out of a powdered titanium, custom fitted to the hands of Green. Any slight slip of his hands could end disasterously, therefore 3D printing was the perfect method of customization.  It is also a zero waste steering wheel, just like most other 3D printed parts which have been created with laser sintering technology. The wheel has the control buttons for the parachutes, the air brakes and also the rocket, with the two trigger switches built in.  It likely is the single most important part of the vehicle.

Below you will find a video with driver Andy Green discussing the various details of the tiny, yet extremely efficient cockpit of what he hopes will be a record breaking vehicle. Do you think Andy and his team at Bloodhound can succeed in surpassing the current land speed record by a staggering 237 miles per hour? Let us know in the Bloodhound forum thread at 3DPB.com.