3D Printed Braille Puzzle Helps the Visually Impaired to Learn Words

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Learning to read Braille increases the likelihood of a visually impaired person’s finding employment or pursuing higher education by more than three times. Unfortunately, many resources for learning Braille are either ineffective or too costly for the average person. A digital Braille reading device costs over $1,000, which is unaffordable for many, particularly for the 90% of the visually impaired population living in developing countries. Instead, these people often receive very basic, outdated learning material that’s largely ineffective.

3D printing lends itself well to Braille, as has been shown through projects like 3D printed Braille Rubik’s cubes and chess sets. Now a new 3D printed puzzle has been developed, and it’s designed to help the user learn how to read Braille. Fittle was designed through a collaboration between Indian designer Tania Jain, India’s leading eye institute LVPEI, German educational toy company Ravensburger, and independent global communication group Serviceplan.

Each puzzle is divided into pieces, with a Braille letter on each piece. Together, they spell out the name of an object. Connecting marks on each piece help the user figure out how they fit together, and once complete, they can feel the shape of the object and learn the Braille word for it. Originally, the design team made the puzzles out of wood, but they realized they needed something lower-cost and so turned to 3D printing. With support from Novabeans, they decided to go with the Ultimaker 2+ for its quality, usability and price. They had tried both larger and cheaper 3D printers, but the large printers were too expensive while the budget printers could not deliver the durability and accuracy they needed.

The Fitttle pieces are 3D printed with a hollow design to minimize material usage. 3D printing also lowered the cost of prototyping so that the team could get feedback from the visually impaired community.

There are now multiple Fittle shapes, which are 3D printed and distributed across India. The puzzles are given to LVPEI’s regional centers, which pass them on to Braille learners. Users can learn how to spell things such as ‘fish,’ ‘mouse,’ ‘ship,’ ‘rocket’ and many other words; Fittle is continuously developing new shapes and plans to introduce more of them in the future.

“Feedback has been overwhelming so far,” said Christoph Bohlender, Creative Director at Serviceplan Health and Life. “More and more children are learning braille better with Fittle.”

$10,000 buys four digital Braille readers or 200 Braille books – or 16,000 3D printed puzzles plus a 3D printer. Fittle’s future goals include funding more 3D printers, creating new shapes, distributing more puzzles, and ultimately expanding to other regions. The puzzles have also been made open source for download from Fittle’s website.

3D printing has played a major role in improving the lives of the visually impaired, being used to create such things as tactile maps and tactile books, as well as learning tools. It isn’t easy to get around in the world without sight, but many thoughtful and inventive people have used technology to make it a little bit easier.

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[Source/Images: Ultimaker]

Robot with 3D Printed Flippers Helps to Solve a Plesiosaur Puzzle

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Plesiosaur [Image: Dinosaur Jungle]

Over 200 million years ago, during the Triassic period, plesiosaurs first appeared in the ocean. The swimming, flippered reptiles lived for several million years, until the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs, but like their land-dwelling counterparts, plesiosaurs are still a source of fascination for scientists and prehistoric-animal enthusiasts. These particular reptiles present a particular challenge for scientists, however, because until now, no one has been able to figure out quite how plesiosaurs managed to swim. Most flippered animals have two distinct sets of flippers: the ones in the front are designed to produce thrust, while the flippers in the back are used for steering.

Fossils, however, have shown that the plesiosaur had four nearly identical flippers, which means that however the plesiosaur got around, it was quite different than any other flippered animal, according to experts. It’s been unclear how exactly plesiosaur mobility worked, but thanks to a robot with 3D printed flippers, researchers at the University of Southampton and the University of Bristol may have finally figured it out.

PhD student Luke Muscutt led a team of researchers who constructed a robot and attached 3D printed flippers, designed based on plesiosaur fossils. They also used X-rays of currently existing flippered animals to determine what kinds of movements the robot would need to make.The team then ran a set of experiments on their simulated plesiosaur in a water tank.

Colored water shows the vortices produced by the 3D printed flippers

If the plesiosaur’s method of mobility was ineffective, the species would have either evolved or gone extinct much sooner, so scientists studying the reptile have been aware that their flippers did work well – the question has been how. Experimenting with the robot in the water tank, Muscutt and his team made an interesting discovery: the front flippers created swirling movements in the water, which increased the thrust of the back flippers by up to 60 percent and their efficiency by up to 40 percent when both sets of flippers worked together as opposed to when they moved independently. This indicated that all four flippers were used to propel the plesiosaur through the water, which differs from the movement of, for example, a turtle. The experiments also showed exactly how the flippers would need to have moved in relation to each other in order to create the most effective propulsion.

[Image: Muscutt et al/Royal Society Publishing]

“Fossils by themselves don’t tell us much about how plesiosaurs actually moved. Short of genetically engineering a plesiosaur, our best available option was to create a robot to show how it might have happened,” said Muscutt. “The results were amazing and indicate why plesiosaurs were such a successful species, retaining four flippers for more than 100 million years. If this wasn’t the case, it’s unlikely the four-flipper system would have been maintained for so long.”

Muscutt plans to further his studies by examining different types of plesiosaurs and how their movements may have differed from each other. He’s also interested in how the motion system of the plesiosaur could be adapted for modern applications, such as submarines.

“Understanding how an animal might have moved gives us a better understanding of the animal as a whole – for instance, how far it can travel, what animals it can predate on, and what it might have fallen prey to,” he said. “Our observations of tandem flipper systems such as the plesiosaur’s might also eventually have a real-world application – as a propulsion system for undersea vehicles, for instance, that could help make them more manoeuvrable, efficient and quieter.”

The research was documented in a paper entitled “The four-flipper swimming method of plesiosaurs enabled efficient and effective locomotion,” which you can read here. Authors include Luke E. Muscutt, Gareth Dyke, Gabriel D. Weymouth, Darren Naish, Colin Palmer, and Bharathram Ganapathisubramani.

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[Source: University of Southampton]

Bfun Wood 3D Animal Puzzles Scorpion 3D Woodcraft Kit Assemble Paint DIY 3D Puzzle Toys for Kids Adults the Best Birthday Gift


This is a fun, educational, and somewhat challenging puzzle.

After you build it with the pieces one by one, also you can try to paint yourself to make it more beautiful.

This is a challenge to your operation ability. You can DIY as a family activity. Innovative, Imaginative, Intelligent and Interactive.


Pre-cut and numbered pieces match a detailed instructional assembly sheet, each product has a piece of sanding paper for sanding sharp corners to protect children tender skin.


Wood raw material has passed the FSC test, in line with national laws and regulations on the quality requirements of wooden toys, according to EU standards and U.S. standards.

Wood treatment has reached the standard of GB 16483 with the most rigorous and environmental standards of EO glue.

This toy is surprisingly durable, been dropped a number of times, it still keeps well.

Despite the most serious consequence being the detachment from his body, it can be easily reattached.


The use of painting materials are comply with ‘GB24613-2009’. Our factory is strict to the raw materials.

the selection of qualified suppliers and the purchase of good raw material to ensure the safety and reliability of raw materials.

We provide environmental, safe and reliable gaming experience for every customer!


You have 10 different choices, such as animals, vehicle, weapon, dinosaur.

Besides, the coating has 4color, use it to build a kingdom of art.

Product Features

  • 3D static puzzles, perfect fit for DIY, paint it yourselves, 4 years up, if they are too small need to be operated under the care of adults.
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  • 10 different products currently, include animals, vehicle, weapon, dinosaur, more choice.
  • Package included : 1puzzle, 4 color painting box, 1 Brush, 1 gauze.

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