3D Printing News Sliced: Proto Labs, Optomec, ARMI and Strandbeest

In today’s Sliced 3D printing news digest: ColorPod, the 3D Pioneers ChallengeOptomec, id.arts, Proto Labs, Joint Mitnor, 3Diligent, ARMI, University of Florida, Sculpteo and Strandbeest.

ColorPod demos full color 3D printed busts

A new video from Aad van der Geest, founder of VDG Spitstechniek, shows how the ColorPod full-color FDM upgrade can be used to make 3D printed busts.

From scan to sculpture” clip via filmpjeslader on YouTube

At a fraction of the cost of other full-color 3D printing alternatives, the clip serves as a teaser to what is possible with material know how and a lot of ingenuity.

Winners of the 3D Pioneers Challenge announced

The second edition of 3D printing design competition 3DPC has celebrated the work of seven designers from across the globe.

In addition to getting their designs noticed by industry partners including Stratasys and Autodesk, each of the winners received a share of €15,000 ($17,800) and exclusive prizes from MakerBot and designreport.

Winning entries include a metal 3D printed skateboard truck by Philipp Manger, and the Palmyra Rebuilt project from Eric Geboers and Matteo Baldassari.

Jury comment on Project T.O.S.T. (Topology Optimized Skateboard Trucks): " It´s so lightweight, that even Marty Mc Fly could hover on it." Image via 3DPCJury comment on Project T.O.S.T. (Topology Optimized Skateboard Trucks): ” It´s so lightweight, that even Marty Mc Fly could hover on it.” Image via 3DPC

Optomec publishes 3D printer materials recipes

To help customers make the most of new additive manufacturing techniques, Optomec has released a catalogue of material recipe sheets.

Available for both LENS and Aerosel Jet methods, the examples provide detailed parameters of what to expect from the respective materials and inks.

A GE Turbine blade with 3D printed strain sensors. Photo via Optomec.A GE Turbine blade with Aerosol Jet 3D printed strain sensors. Photo via Optomec.

Designers use 3D printing to create a vision of the dream kitchen

Japanese design firm id.arts demos FDM, SLA, SLS, and inkjet 3D printing techniques in a miniature kitchen model.

With added textures and post processing, the finished product has a hyper-real quality, and is developed for clients with a keen eye for detail.

Detail of 3D printed worktop in id.arts model kitchen. Photo via id.artsDetail of 3D printed worktop in id.arts model kitchen. Photo via id.arts

Proto Labs adds HP MJF to its services

Rapid manufacturing service provider Proto Labs (NYSE:PRLB) is speeding up its 3D printing capabilities with a HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D printer.

The company is the latest in a line of North American companies to offer the technology to its customers.

A Multi Jet Fusion 3D printed camera shutter. Photo via HPA Multi Jet Fusion 3D printed camera shutter. Photo via HP

University of Chicago researchers use 3D printing to envision fluid dynamics 

A team of researchers studying fluid dynamics, applying to the likes of airplanes, boats and tornados, have made a discovery using a 3D printed model of a helical vortex.

3D printed helical vortex from he University of Chicago. Image by William Irvine3D printed helical vortex from the University of Chicago. Image by William Irvine

Conclusions show “that helicity can remain constant even in a viscous fluid and provide an improved basis for understanding and manipulating helicity in real flows.”

A full paper on the study can be read online in Science Magazine.

Joint Mitnor cave to reopen with 3D printed fossils

The Joint Mitnor cave in Devon, England, is set to reopen August 12 2017.

Ransacked by thieves in 2015, the site has been refurbished with 3D printed replicas of the fossils it used to contain. The models were created using CT scanning techniques and gypsum casting, so they look and feel faithful to the original remains.

3D printed fossil replicas in Joint Mitnor. Photo by Charlie Bird3D printed fossil replicas in Joint Mitnor. Photo by Charlie Bird

3Diligent releases Complete Guide to Metal 3D Printing

Digital manufacturing service 3Diligent has released a 13 page report detailing leading metal additive manufacturing technologies.

Featuring the likes of Boeing and GE the document provides 3Diligent’s perceived overview of the “State of Professional and Industrial 3D Printing”.

ARMI liquid silicone 3D printing used to model cancer cells

In an interview with Fox News, associate professor Thomas Angelini has revealed new developments in 3D printing research at the University of Florida.

Using a liquid silicone 3D printing technique, reviewed by 3D Printing Industry in May 2017, the Advanced Regenerative Manufacturing Institute (ARMI) is making microscopic models of cancer cells.

Known collectively as “tumeroids”, the models will be used to test the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs and gain a better understanding of the disease.

The speeded-up liquid silicone 3D printing process from the ARMI. Clip via UF Soft Matter on YouTube

Sculpteo designer goes viral with 3D printed Strandbeest

Nicolas Raynaud is a freelance software engineer based in Montpellier, France.

Taking inspiration from Dutch artist Theo Jansen, Raynaud has gone viral on Reddit and Twitter with his version of a Strandbeest mechanism.

Gif by Nicolas Raynaud

Made using Sculpteo’s online 3D printing service, the design has since been picked up by the cloud-based rapid prototyping company, and now features in a “how to” on the company’s website.

If any of our readers have a go at 3D printing their own Strandbeest or other design projects, be sure to tweet a photo at us or share it on our Facebook page.

Stay up to date with all the latest additive manufacturing news by signing up to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, and check out or events page here.

Featured image: Sliced logo over an original Strandbeest by Theo Jansen. Photo by Robbert van den Beld, robbeld on Flickr

Optomec expands metal and electronics 3D printing systems into Australia and New Zealand

Optomec has announced the signing of a distribution agreement with Emona Instruments Pty. Ltd to expand sales of its electronics and metal 3D printing systems into Australia and New Zealand.

Emona is the leading supplier of additive manufacturing systems and engineering teaching equipment in Australia and New Zealand and has a 35-year track record of training engineers on new technologies and tools. The company will now be responsible for the distribution of the New Mexico-based additive manufacturing company’s range of LENs systems for 3D printed metals and Aerosol Jet systems for printed electronics. 

Optomec Aerosol Jet printers provide high-resolution 3D printing capabilities required to manufacture smaller, lighter-weight, high-performance devices used in industries such as aerospace, defense, consumer electronics and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Optomec LENS printers can completely build new metal parts or add material to existing metal components for repair and hybrid manufacturing applications.

“With Optomec’s established track record in Australia including users such as CSIRO’s Lab22, Swinburne University of Technology, Deakin University, UNSW, and University of Queensland, we look forward to the Emona /Optomec partnership further building on this success and reinforcing our position as the leaders in additive manufacturing in the region,” Mark Breznik, Managing Director at Emona Instruments, explained.

“We are very excited about our partnership with Emona to expand sales of Optomec products in Australia and New Zealand,” Michael Kardos, Optomec Vice President of World Wide Sales, added. 

LITE-ON Implements Optomec 3D Printing Systems

Optomec, a provider of production-grade additive manufacturing systems, has stated its Aerosol Jet technology is being used by LITE-ON to develop electronic devices. LITE-ON has created a 3D Direct Printing (3DP) solution that lets them integrate 3D antenna patterns and other functional electronics into mechanical structures or covers.

According to the company, LITE-ON first purchased Aerosol Jet technology to develop prototypes for its OEM (original equipment manufacturer) customers, which include communication device, personal care and automotive brands. After successfully implementing Aerosol Jet in prototype environments, LITE-ON expanded its usage and has now deployed multiple production machines in Guangzhou, China, operating 24/7 printing conformal electronics onto millions of consumer devices.

“With the flexibility provided by Aerosol Jet technology, our 3DP systems can print sensors, antennas and other functional electronics onto plastic components and covers as well as metal die-cast insert-molded polymer frames and even onto glass panels and ceramic materials,” said Henrik Johansson, senior manager, Technology Development Antennas, at LITE-ON. “We see Aerosol Jet as a strategic component of our 3DP solution, which has enabled us to expand into new markets.”

For more information, visit Optomec.

Sources: Press materials received from the company and additional information gleaned from the company’s website.

Dragonfly to Distribute Optomec Laser Additive Manufacturing Systems in Italy

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M., Jan. 17, 2016 — Product and service provider Dragonfly SRL of Capua, Italy, will distribute Optomec Inc.’s LENS (laser-engineered net shaping) systems for 3D-printed metals and Aerosol Jet systems for 3D-printed electronics to industrial customers in Italy.

Dragonfly specializes in the additive manufacturing sector and is the first distributor to offer the products in Italy. Optomec’s LENS printers use a high-power (500-W to 4-kW) laser to build up structures one layer at a time directly from powdered metals. The process can completely build new metal parts or add material to existing metal components for repair and hybrid manufacturing applications. LENS technology is available in standalone system configurations or as a modular print engine for integration with existing computer-numerical-control automation platforms and robots.

Aerosol Jet printers provide high-resolution 3D printing capabilities required to manufacture smaller, lighter-weight devices used in industries such as aerospace, defense, consumer electronics and the Internet of Things.