Global 3D Printing (3DP) Market Outlook 2018- Stratasys, Ltd., 3D Systems, Inc., Materialise NV …

Reportsbuzz added a new latest industry research report that focuses on ”3D Printing (3DP) market ” and provides in-depth Global 3D Printing (3DP) market analysis and future prospects of 3D Printing (3DP) market 2017. The research study covers significant data which makes the document a handy resource for managers, analysts, industry experts and other key people get ready-to-access and self-analyzed study along with graphs and tables to help understand market trends, drivers and market challenges. The research study is segmented by Application/ end users Automotive, Aerospace & Defense, Healthcare, Consumer Electronics, Industrial, Power & Energy, Others, products type Stereolithography, Fuse Deposition Modeling, Selective Laser Sintering, Direct Metal Laser Sintering, Polyjet Printing, Inkjet Printing, Electron Beam Melting, Laser Metal Deposition, Digital Light Processing, Laminated Object Manufacturing and geographies like United States, China, Europe, Japan, Korea & Taiwan.

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The research covers the current market size of the Global 3D Printing (3DP) market and its growth rates based on 5 year history data along with company profile of key players/manufacturers such as Stratasys, Ltd., 3D Systems, Inc., Materialise NV, Autodesk, Inc., GE Additive, Made In Space, Voxeljet AG, Canon, Inc.. The in-depth information by segments of 3D Printing (3DP) market helps monitor future profitability & to make critical decisions for growth. The information on trends and developments, focuses on markets and materials, capacities, technologies, CAPEX cycle and the changing structure of the Global 3D Printing (3DP) Market.

The study provides company profiling, product picture and specifications, sales, market share and contact information of key manufacturers of Global 3D Printing (3DP) Market, some of them listed here are Stratasys, Ltd., 3D Systems, Inc., Materialise NV, Autodesk, Inc., GE Additive, Made In Space, Voxeljet AG, Canon, Inc.. The market is growing at a very rapid pace and with rise in technological innovation, competition and M&A activities in the industry many local and regional vendors are offering specific application products for varied end-users. The new manufacturer entrants in the market are finding it hard to compete with the international vendors based on quality, reliability, and innovations in technology.

Global 3D Printing (3DP) (Thousands Units) and Revenue (Million USD) Market Split by Product Type such as Stereolithography, Fuse Deposition Modeling, Selective Laser Sintering, Direct Metal Laser Sintering, Polyjet Printing, Inkjet Printing, Electron Beam Melting, Laser Metal Deposition, Digital Light Processing, Laminated Object Manufacturing. Further the research study is segmented by Application & Other with historical and projected market share and compounded annual growth rate.

Geographically, this report is segmented into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue (million USD), and market share and growth rate of 3D Printing (3DP) in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering United States, China, Europe, Japan, Korea & Taiwan and its Share (%) and CAGR for the forecasted period 2017 to 2022.

Read full Research Report Study at @: www.reportsbuzz.com/36153/global-3d-printing-3dp-market-outlook-2018-2023-analysis-opportunities-segmentation-and-forecast/

What this Research Study Offers:

1. Global 3D Printing (3DP) Market share assessments for the regional and country level segments
2. Market share analysis of the top industry players
3. Strategic recommendations for the new entrants
4. Market forecasts for a minimum of 5 years of all the mentioned segments, sub segments and the regional markets
5. Market Trends (Drivers, Constraints, Opportunities, Threats, Challenges, Investment Opportunities, and recommendations)
6. Strategic recommendations in key business segments based on the market estimations
7. Competitive landscaping mapping the key common trends
8. Company profiling with detailed strategies, financials, and recent developments
9. Supply chain trends mapping the latest technological advancements

There are 15 Chapters to display the Global 3D Printing (3DP) market

Chapter 1, Definition, Specifications and Classification of 3D Printing (3DP) , Applications of 3D Printing (3DP) , Market Segment by Regions;
Chapter 2, Manufacturing Cost Structure, Raw Material and Suppliers, Manufacturing Process, Industry Chain Structure;
Chapter 3, Technical Data and Manufacturing Plants Analysis of 3D Printing (3DP) , Capacity and Commercial Production Date, Manufacturing Plants Distribution, R&D Status and Technology Source, Raw Materials Sources Analysis;
Chapter 4, Overall Market Analysis, Capacity Analysis (Company Segment), Sales Analysis (Company Segment), Sales Price Analysis (Company Segment);
Chapter 5 and 6, Regional Market Analysis that includes United States, China, Europe, Japan, Korea & Taiwan, 3D Printing (3DP) Segment Market Analysis (by Type);
Chapter 7 and 8, The 3D Printing (3DP) Segment Market Analysis (by Application) Major Manufacturers Analysis of 3D Printing (3DP) ;
Chapter 9, Market Trend Analysis, Regional Market Trend, Market Trend by Product Type Stereolithography, Fuse Deposition Modeling, Selective Laser Sintering, Direct Metal Laser Sintering, Polyjet Printing, Inkjet Printing, Electron Beam Melting, Laser Metal Deposition, Digital Light Processing, Laminated Object Manufacturing, Market Trend by Application Automotive, Aerospace & Defense, Healthcare, Consumer Electronics, Industrial, Power & Energy, Others;
Chapter 10, Regional Marketing Type Analysis, International Trade Type Analysis, Supply Chain Analysis;
Chapter 11, The Consumers Analysis of Global 3D Printing (3DP) ;
Chapter 12, 3D Printing (3DP) Research Findings and Conclusion, Appendix, methodology and data source;
Chapter 13, 14 and 15, 3D Printing (3DP) sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers, Research Findings and Conclusion, appendix and data source.

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Materialise collaborates with PTC to make manufacturers Industry 4.0 ready

Software company PTC has teamed up with Belgium-based 3D printer market leader Materialise to expand the capabilities of its Creo CAD software.

Taking the form of a new software package, the collaboration will allow Creo users to integrate 3D printing into their manufacturing processes, with a special emphasis on metal additive manufacturing.

Part analysis in Creo. Image via PTC.Part-analysis in ThingWorx. Image via PTC.

Design with PTC, build with Materialise

The new PTC software package is intended for manufacturing end-use products and will be compatible with machines linked up to the Materialise Build Processor.

The Build Processor is a slicing feature of Materialise’s Magic 3D Print Suite, an all-encompassing 3D software bundle.

The enhanced connection between PTC CAD software and the Materialise Build Processor simplifies the integration of 3D printing for discrete manufacturers, making distinct items such as plane, cars and mobile phone.

The software package also includes Materialise’s support generation technology, which gives designers more control over the design and creation of metal support structures.

“This collaboration with PTC will expand access to 3D Printing and help engineers and designers think in terms of additive, rather than traditional manufacturing for rapid product design and development,” said Stefaan Motte, VP at Materialise Software.

“Together with Materialise, we will bridge the gap between CAD design software and the 3D printing machines,” added Brian Thompson, senior VP at PTC. 

A Chain Dress prepared for slicing in the materialise build processor. Image via Materialise.A chain-dress prepared for slicing in the Materialise build processor. Image via Materialise.

Integrating CAD, 3D printing and IoT with PTC

Materialise integration is the latest in a number of software integration agreements made by PTC to facilitate interaction between software and hardware.

In May 2017, 3D printer manufacturer 3D Systems announced that it was embedding intelligent features powered by PTC’s ThingWorx industrial internet of things (IIoT) platform into its machines, allowing users to monitor prints in real time.

Later that year, PTC integrated ANSYS simulation into its ThingWorx platform, allowing customers to both analyze the part manufacturing process and predict the component’s performance based on the design and a set of parameters.

Let us know what you think the most important 3D software release has been this year.Make your nominations for the 3D Printing Industry Awards 2018 now.

For more information on 3D software and industry 4.0, subscribe to our free 3D Printing Industry newsletter, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Featured image shows functional end-use part design in Creo. Photo via PTC.

Materialise to build Europe's largest and most modern 3D printing factory near Wroclaw in Poland

Aug 11, 2016 | By Alec

Belgian 3D printing specialists Materialise hardly need introduction. The largest provider of high quality 3D printing services in Europe, they are especially known for taking on the hardest and largest 3D printing challenges – such as this 3D printed medical grade replica of Ötzi the Ice Man. They are also experts when it comes to medical 3D printing innovations, which is perfectly illustrated by this life-saving 3D printed tracheal splint. But Materialise is now ready for the next phase in their career, and are about to start construction on Europe’s largest and most modern 3D printing factory. Built in the Polish village of Bielany Wrocławskie (near Wrocław), it will allow them to cope with 3D printing projects of a much larger scale.

It’s a huge project that will cost several million zlotys (or several hundred thousand dollars) to complete. Construction, which is set to begin later this year, is planned to end in mid-2017. Once open, this 3D printing factory will employ about fifty people. Aside from 3D printing, the factory will also house a state-of-the-art post-production facility, where all kinds of manufactured items will be perfected in-house – making this a truly comprehensive 3D printing factory.

But of course you might wonder: why is a Belgian 3D printing specialist building a factory in Eastern Europe? In part, it will allow Materialise to become a leading player in the Eastern European 3D printing market. But more importantly, it’s because they already have a strong presence in Wrocław. Two years ago, Materialise acquired e-Prototypy, the leading Polish 3D printing provider at the time, who was known for providing a very wide range of 3D services.

That move in 2014 was already seen as an attempt to establish a strong presence in Poland, after  Materialise previously did the same in the Czech Republic. “We see a lot of opportunities for growth in the Polish market and by joining Materialise, the e-Prototypy team looks forward to helping even more people in the region realize the benefits of the services and solutions we have to offer,” e-Prototypy co-founder Grzegorz Sworobowicz said at the time. “As part of Materialise, our customers will be given access to even better service with a larger range of 3D Printing technologies and they can benefit from Materialise’s 23 years of experience in this industry.”

As a result, Wrocław is already home to sales, accounting, IT and research and development departments, making it a logical location for this expansion. But according to local Materialise branch leader Piotr Adamczewski the effects of this new factory will be felt far beyond Poland as well. “We are concerned with maintaining a leading position in the global industry,” he said. “We expect to benefit from offering attractive prices, allowing us to more strongly compete in international markets while we are simultaneously improving our own technological and digital solutions.”

This new factory is thus a perfect opportunity for Materialise to extend their presence in the automotive, aerospace and medical industries. Materialise is already working with Airbus on 3D printed aircraft parts, and a larger factory will only contribute to the development of similar innovations. It will doubtlessly also strengthen their foothold in the consumer and design sectors.

But according to Adamczewski, they are particularly focused on medical care as well. “We are helping to develop new life-saving medical care solutions, in close collaboration with the surgeons themselves. One example of what we already achieved is the production of cardiac models for two patients in India – thanks to the 3D printed models, hitherto impossible surgeries could be meticulously planned and executed.” A lot more medical tools, all adapted to the individual needs of the patients, can thus be expected. Materialise is about to enter the next phase of their 3D printing life.

Posted in 3D Printer Company

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Five Tips About 3D Printed Wearables From Materialise

shoe1Given that we are so particular about the things that we wear on our bodies, it makes sense that “wearables” is such a growing category in the 3D printing industry. What are wearables? Anything you wear on your body: clothing, jewelry, accessories — including eyewear. Materialise has announced five major eyewear projects in the past year, fashion collaborations, and other consumer products like hearing aids. Because the company has so much recent experience developing 3D printed products, it offers 5 tips for 3D printed Wearables in a recent blog post.

Aesthetics is the first area covered here, as it is important for your wearables to capture the design freedom of your product’s brand. Part of this freedom is making your wearables available in a wide variety of colors and finishes, since people are so particular about their tastes when customizing their own selections.

Next we focus on design issues, where thinking outside the box gets rewarded while certain considerations, like the material you decide to 3D print with, can also make a big impact on your design decisions. The example that Materialise gives here is the knitwear designer Hannah Evans, who explains that her designs changed when she considered 3D printing: “You can use materials that just aren’t physically possible on a knit machine, which completely expands the possibilities with knitwear.”

shoe3

Your wearable products’ overall designs will be largely impacted by the possibilities presented by the technology — once you decide to produce 3D printed items in your business.

Innovation is also a key consideration here. While 3D printing is still a relatively new technology, it is gaining in popularity, and so innovation becomes the quality that will allow your own business to stand out among the others. However, some of us get swept away by the technology’s promise of eternal innovation, losing sight of the fact that these items will have to be used in a practical sense, too. Materialise provides the example of the Adidas Futurecraft shoe, which offers functional integration and better performance with its 3D printed midsole.

shoe2Of course, this list would not be complete without mentioning customization and personalization. These two qualities are probably the main reasons that people are attracted to 3D printed items in the first place. Wearables that can be customized, even “mass customized,” will become more common as people catch onto the benefits of having their exact fit and design needs met. Mass customization allows for a product that can be easily customized using tools that also allow the product to be made quickly and efficiently. Eyewear and insoles are a great example of this; the wearer’s measurements help craft high-quality products that fit like a glove. Usually people won’t go back to non-customized products once they have tried the 3D printed kind out: this is a good thing to keep in mind.

Finally, as the materials end of the 3D printing wearables sector gets more developed, performance and durability become increasing possibilities. Product materials need to be durable, perspiration-proof, UV-resistant, stain-resistant, and skin contact-safe. Materialise uses the Luxura brand as an example:

“For eyewear, jewelry and other wearable consumer products, skin contact will be a constant reality of the product’s usage. Exposure to a wearer’s skin can affect the product’s finish over time, potentially making colors less vibrant or surface treatments less effective. Environmental wear and tear is inevitable, but a good finish can reduce the surface porosity and protect it from changing colors due to UV light, or acquiring stains and marks.”

shoe4

If you are interested in developing a 3D printed wearables product line, hopefully these considerations will help you incorporate aesthetics, design, innovation, customization, and performance into your business. Discuss further in the 3D Printed Wearables Tips from Materialise forum over at 3DPB.com.