OOKU® Creative 3D Printing Pen Kit – 3D Pen with 1.75mm PLA ABS Filament for Building, Crafting, Drawing, Prototyping | Smart AutoOff | Slim Light design | 3 Speed Auto Extrusion – PINK

OOKU 3D Printer Pen – Creativity Unleashed | with USB charger cable

Designed, tailored and optimized for everyday creations with the power of 3D Printing, all in a single doodle pen.

From simplicity of use with auto-feeding of any 1.75 mm PLA/ABS material, to the natural fit into your hands, to low temperature ceramic head, the OOKU 3D Doodle Pen brings your creative imaginations to life with OOKU’s micro 3D printing pen technology.

Quickly melt and cool the ABS/PLA/HIPS printing material to create rigid free standing structures, forms, and shapes. Create individual parts and pieces or combine pieces together to unleash your imagination.

On demand Prototyping, drawing, and crafting is here.

Features

– Ooku’s Natural Slim Fit design ensures the pen fits to your hand comfortably & naturally at just 52 grams.
-OLED display
– Simplicity of use -plug in, select filament type, heat up, and create.
– Plug into any USB power source for great mobility & use anywhere with power bank (with at least 2A output), laptop or wall adapter (not included)
– 3 Extrusion speeds with automatic flow, without the hassle of controlling temperatures.
– Slender 0.7mm tip takes precision and detailing to a new level.
– Lower temperatures and greatest heat efficiency keeping the pen cool and safe during use with ceramic head.
– Smart automatic shutdown after 10 minutes of idling

Product Includes

1 x OOKU 3D Pen Printer
3 x Multi-colored 1.75mm Biodegradable PLA filament packs (random colors)
1 x Pen Holder Stand
1 x USB Charger Cable (wall adapter not included)
1 x Manual

Safety and Warning Instruction

1. This 3D Pen is suitable for children and adults over 8 years of age. Supervision of small children during product use is required.
2. The output nozzle tip can reach 250 degrees F so keep your hands and fingers away from the nozzle and avoid direct contact.

Product Features

  • A HAND HELD 3D PRINTER PEN: Prototype, craft, and create pieces and objects by drawing with the pen using 3D printing plastics like 1.75mm ABS or PLA Filament – Think like a builder by combining parts and pieces of objects to form a new grander object.
  • CREATE EASILY with our simple of use Ooku 3D pen design. Just plug in, power on, select material type, heat up, and create. 3 adjustable automatic extrusion speeds without worrying about material flow, and without the hassle of setting different temperatures.
  • At 52 Grams, Ooku’s LIGHT NAUTRAL FIT design ensures the 3D Printing Pen fits into your hands comfortably and naturally – like holding a marker. No heavy or bulky shaped designs that cramp up your style and hands. NO maintenance or jams with our SMART Infeed and Extrusion design.
  • 3D Printer Kit BONUSES INCLUDE: – 3 set of random color 1.75 mm PLA filaments – Pen holder stand
  • USB POWER Cable Included – providing you with more flexibility to use and create outside or on the go, when connected to any power source like your Laptop, Battery Power Bank (2A output or greater). AC Wall adapter not included.

Check Out Our Website For Details…

In summer STEM program, high school students design 3-D printed hands for kids in need

A new summer STEM program is giving high school students from across Western New York the opportunity to help kids in need through 3-D printing and design.

On Thursday, the lunchroom at Health Sciences Charter School in Buffalo bustled with the sounds of 45 excited high school students. They’d all been brought together for a new summer program focused on STEM education.

As the morning began, three young children took seats amongst the students, and teachers began to interview them.

“What do you like to do?” asked technology education teacher Ed Hawkins.

“I like to play,” replied an initially shy Katelyn McCarthy from Derby.

Like the other two children interviewed, Katelyn was born with one partial forearm and no hand. Her mother, Amy, described the nine year old as outgoing once she opens up, and said the things Katelyn has been able to do with one hand have not been “challenges,” just thing that take a little longer to learn.

“It’s definitely made her more determined,” said Amy. “It makes her try a whole lot harder at things. She doesn’t give up. She tries and tries and tries until she gets it. She recently learned how to tie her shoes, ride her bike – just things that took a little longer, but she learned how to do it.”

Katelyn has had prosthetics since she was an infant – some of which have been heavy or difficult to use. But come August, she’ll get a new light-weight prosthetic limb – 3-D printed, and designed by the students of the Hand in Hand program.

“In this program, kids are going to learn anatomy. They’re going to learn about an achievable biomedical career. They’re going to learn about opportunities that are right here in Western New York and they’re going to create something that’s going to help somebody, and somebody right in their neighborhood,” explained Cherie Messore, Executive Director of Western New York STEM.

WNY STEM is Hand in Hand’s leading organizer. Collaborating with AT&T, the University at Buffalo, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and local schools, they put the call out for teachers and students interested in taking part in the program.

Ed Hawkins was one of them, and he ended up taking the lead educator role in Hand in Hand. Hawkins has a strong background in 3-D printing, having done it for years with his own students at Sweet Home Senior High School. And while he doesn’t have training in occupational therapy or medicine, Hawkins said getting to know the workings of the body so that he can teach students about it is all in looking at it from a technical perspective.

“It’s a biological system, but it’s really down to mechanics,” said Hawkins. “There’s hinges and tendons that work like cables. For myself, I try to break it down into a mechanical system.”

Hawkins also isn’t the only one teaching. Before they met Katelyn and the other recipients, the students met two occupational therapists who explained the realities of life with one hand. One of them even shared his personal experience as an amputee. From that training, students like future 11th grader Felice Masumbuko learned what’s important.

“You need to know math and science, like the geometry. You have to know the biometrics of your hands, eyes, all of that. Biometrics is examples like iris scans, retina scans, how the vessels are formed in your hand. You need to know all of that because even a slight mistake can mess up the whole product,” said Masumbuko.

After measurements of Katelyn and the other recipients’ limbs are taken, it’s time for the students to focus on the first steps in planning. While that happens, the children get a chance to visit a room down the hall filled with computers and 3-D printers – one of them cooling from a recent project, while another hums, slowly and carefully printing keepsake nametags for the students.

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The hands can be designed with various colors and customization like superhero and princess designs. Katelyn can’t be certain yet what color will be available, but she’s got something in mind.

“I really want it to be blue and pink,” she said.

Amy expects the new hand will help expand her daughter’s capability, and she appreciates what the Hand in Hand program offers both Katelyn and the students.

“She’s helping them see what they are creating and that it’s going to help her,” said Amy. “And I like that she’s going to be able to see how it’s done and how it’s created and how they’ve done it for her.”

The next step in the project is what Messore described as a “full court press” to design the hands, print prototypes, and get final products to a fabricator in East Aurora – all within the next week. Three hands will be created for the local children, and one for a child in India found through a community of 3D printers called e-NABLE – who coordinate projects like these around the world. And though it’s a short-term project, the impact of doing social good is already showing in students like soon-to-be 9th grader Cameren Hunley, who has begun to consider his own life.

“I look back when I see these children, I look back at my life and see all the things I did with these two hands,” said Hunley. “And then they have one, and it’s like, ‘What is it like to have one hand and not struggle to do things – things that other people do?’”

Cameren’s not the only one. Being a parent, as well as an educator, Ed Hawkins has quickly built an emotional connection to “Hand in Hand” and the children it will help.

“It’s cool to see these kids who have a significant deficit…they’re just like regular kids,” said a misty-eyed Hawkins. “We’re just trying to make it a little bit better.”

This story was produced with help from WBFO’s Dominic LoVallo.

TORLO: a 3D printed clock with an two-tone minimalist design

Jun 13, 2017 | By David

In an increasingly digital age, the humble analog clock has begun to undergo a surprising resurgence, partly thanks to the accessibility of 3D printing technology.

3D printing enables all kinds of components to be produced relatively cheaply and easily, such as custom gear mechanisms and other parts. After using 3D printing for these very uses, one enterprising Hackaday user recently showed off their own 3D printed time-telling creation, the TORLO.

The clock was designed and built by user Ekaggrat Singh Kalsi, an architect who likes to tinker with engineering in his spare time. Kalsi initially set out to make a clock using a self-oscillating motor, but this task was fraught with difficulties: the motor struggled to keep consistent time, and contacts would wear out. These kinds of problems are not uncommon with electromechanical systems, particularly those working with points ignition.

So Kalsi sought an alternative, and eventually decided to use an Attiny 2313 motor, giving a more precise oscillation. Kalsi also took a coil from a laptop HDD, as the magnets would be strong enough to turn the gears. The motor was set up to pulse every two seconds, pushing the clock forward through a simple 3D printed ratchet and pawn system.

The finished clock is a really impressive thing to behold, with an incredibly simple but effective twist on the traditional clock face we’re used to from the grandfather, the carriage, the Mickey Mouse watch—pretty much everything post-sundial.

The ring gear that forms the outer edge of the clock is turned by the gear train, and it moves the hands along with it. The indicators are angled towards the empty centre of the circle, making it seem like they’re suspended in mid-air. It’s a minimalist, aesthetically pleasing design, and the fact that every part of the clock’s mechanism is clearly visible gives it even more modernist charm.

The two-tone white and red color scheme also adds to striking overall impression of the TORLO.

Kalsi has left instructions as to how to assemble the clock on his Hackaday page, with a detailed log showing the various experiments he tried along the way and the modifications and changes that were made. Anyone with an interest in mechanical engineering, 3D printing technology or design could, with a little effort, put together their own version of the TORLO. The component count is relatively small, and everything is either scavenged or made from affordable 3D printed materials.

Kalsi’s Hackaday account shows a few other clock projects that he’s been working on in the past, showing the potential scope for invention that is inherent in such a classic, simple but functional device. 

Not long ago we reported on a 3D printed clock that was modelled after the lunar phases, and this is just the tip of an increasingly large analog iceberg of time-telling treats from talented tinkerers. More and more people are geting into 3D printing and even more people are starting to think about abandoning their fancy smartphones and digital devices, so only time will tell what the future of time-telling technology holds.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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